johnpierce.us / Opera

About Nathan Gunn
CD

Just Before Sunrise

Release date:  August 7, 2007
amazon.com

amazon.co.uk

amazon.de
Some upcoming engagments

Yahoo! group:  Fans of Nathan Gunn

NathanGunn.com
Just Before Sunrise, Barnes & Noble
1.  Just Before Sunrise

2.  The Briar and the Rose

3.  Polka Dots and Moonbeams

4.  In the Dark Pine-Wood

5.  It Feels Like Home

6.  Say Anything

7.  Time

8.  The Dance of Love

9.  And So it Goes

10.  Innocent When You Dream

11.  The Secret Marriage

12.  When You Are Old and Gray

13.  Jam Tart

14.  This Heart that Flutters

15.  I Have Loved Hours at Sea

Nathan Gunn - Just Before Sunrise (USA)
Nathan Gunn - Just Before Sunrise
My e-mail address: webmaster
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johnpierce.us
"Gunn said he wanted to try more contemporary music to make his work more accessible to a wider audience," reports ABC News.

Gunn said, "It's meant for people who've loved and lost. It's not music for 20-somethings. It's for adults who want quality."
"Like Josh Grobanís music (but featuring a deeper voice), Nathan Gunnís album, 'Just Before Sunrise,' is one beautiful melody after another. The vocals and music are soft, sweet and comforting."--Lauren B., thecelebritycafe.com
"I  must say, this album is not for me, although I admire its singing, and some of its songs. Might it be for you? Just possibly."--Jay Nordlinger, nysun.com
"The song selection consists of mostly soft romantics, which blend nicely together as no one is dramatically different from the other. The album is truly 'easy-listening.' Though, it is far from classical, Gunn's somewhat suppressed operatic qualities are still apparent and a little distracting. His voice is amazing, but it doesn't shine as bright as it would if he were singing Mozart's Figaro."--Aaron Green, about.com
". . . 'Just Before Sunrise' (SonyBMG Masterworks), is not the usual recital disc. Featuring works arranged into an eclectic song cycle by contemporary writers such as Gene Scheer, Ben Moore, Billy Joel, Sting and Tom Waits, it celebrates the quiet tranquility of daybreak. The largely romantic ballads forgo the dark night of the soul for the dawning of recognition."--Laura Emerick, Chicago Sun-Times, August 12, 2007