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About Vittorio Grigolo

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Reviews

September 20, 2007

"Though Grigolo is a most unabashed chewer of scenery (with a penchant for thrashing like a fish caught on a hook), luckily, singing calms him down. And indeed, when he sings, all can be forgiven. Grigolo has a gorgeous tenor with the kind of tone that magically suggests both earthy vigor and nobility. When he opens up in the higher register, it's sheer bliss." --Kate Wingfield reviewing a Washington National Opera La Boheme for MetroWeekly

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"Way out in front, in terms of acting ability and vocal penetration Monday night, was Vittorio Grigolo, a born-to-be-marketed Italian tenor with considerable crossover potential (he has already released a pop CD).

"His endearing portrayal of Rodolfo was a potent mix of vulnerability and volatility. His essentially light voice carried well in the house and rode the crest of Puccini's melodic lines sturdily, if not effortlessly, and he shaped Che gelida manina with especially sensitive nuances."--Tim Smith reviewing a Washington National Opera La Boheme for Baltimore Sun

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"And though the singers seem to have been cast as much for looks as voice, the singing is good enough, even notable in the case of Vittorio Grigolo, who studied the leading tenor role of Rodolfo with Luciano Pavarotti in the months before his death.

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". . . From Pavarotti, he seems to have learned a firm, focused projection technique. He also looks like Orlando Bloom. How often does that combination happen?"--David Patrick Stearns reviewing a Washington National Opera La Bohème for the Philadelphia Inquirer

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September 17, 2007

"Because the singers were chosen more for their tender age and good looks, we are obliged to start there. Tenor Vittorio Grigolo (Rodolfo) and soprano Nicole Cabell (Musetta) have both traded on their striking physiques to sell solo albums of dubious musical worth, and they are beautiful to watch live.

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"Was the visual beauty of the cast, such as it was, really worth the musical sacrifices? Vittorio Grigolo was actually not as bad as initially feared, judging from his side career as a pop singer. (At least Grigolo had the good sense to turn down Simon Cowell's invitation to join Il Divo.) He had the high notes for Rodolfo, if without the sustained power, consistently beautiful tone, and subtle approach to line that make the best performances of Puccini. Trevor Scheunemann was a more refined presence as Schaunard, and Paolo Pecchioli had a nice turn in the Act IV coat aria as Colline. At least Grigolo's voice came across the orchestra for the most part, with some low notes getting lost."--Charles Downey reviewing a Washington National Opera La Bohème for DCist

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"Opening-night honors go to tenor Vittorio Grigolo as Rodolfo. Trim and attractive as befits a romantic lead, Mr. Grigolo erupted with astounding yet controlled passion in the first act's famous love aria and duet. His performance throughout was brilliant, yet poised. He clearly has enormous potential to become one of the new generation's truly great singers."--T. L. Ponick reviewing a Washington National Opera La Boheme for the Washington Times

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"And then there is Grigolo, who, according to his biography in the program guide, 'perfected the role of Rodolfo under Maestro Luciano Pavarotti.' I wouldn't go quite that far -- has anybody, anywhere, 'perfected' anything? and should this sort of puffery be permitted in a reference source? -- but he is a wonderful young musician, and perhaps the director of his next 'Bohème' will permit him the indulgence of embracing his lost Mimi instead of having him fuss, twitch, slouch and then ram himself into the wall."--Tim Page reviewing a Washington National Opera La Bohème for the Washington Post

 

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